Category Archives: In the News

Review: ‘Guerrilla Theater Works 3: A New Nation’ by Convergence Theatre

The overarching point of the Convergence theater piece is that there isn’t any “they.”  There are individual people, all with names, dreams, hopes, fears, and children of their own. Using four excellent actors – Fabiolla da Silva, Sebastian Leighton, Cristian Camilo Linares, and Karoline Troger – and a skilled production team, the group, under the direction of Natalia Gleason-Nagy and Elena Velasco, has devised a series of spoken, projected, and movement vignettes (“snapshots”) that vividly present the thoughts, feelings, and lived realities of immigrants’ journeys. Rather than having a linear plot, A New Nation creates a mosaic of the current immigrant experience. Read the full review here!

Resident Theatre Incubator Workshop tackles “Gentrifying Anacostia”

 Musical ‘East Of The River’ Examines A Gentrifying Anacostia.

Nothing says “gentrification” quite like the opening of a Whole Foods. That’s the message, at least, of a new musical about the idea that a location of the largely organic, high-priced grocery chain could one day open in Washington, D.C.’s Anacostia neighborhood. This workshop was funded in part by ARCH Development Corporation. Read and listen to the full interview here.

MahoganyBooks featured in Vanity Fair

 “Culture and community have always been who we are,” says Ramunda Young, one half of the couple behind the beloved 11-year-old online retailer Mahogany Books, which opened its first brick-and-mortar shop late last year. The bookstore, situated in Washington, D.C.’s Anacostia, is the predominantly black neighborhood’s first in more than 20 years—a fact Ramunda herself calls “unfathomable” in what is widely considered the country’s most literate city. Read the full article here.

Nubian Hueman wins City Paper Award Best Manifestation of Black Excellence

With Nubian Hueman, owner Anika Hobbs has created something of a safe haven, a space in which black people can celebrate Pan-Africanism and the global reach of their blackness, and do the Wakandan salute in peace. Southeast D.C. proved to be the perfect place for Hobbs to showcase the beauty of black culture in the city. “Anacostia was one of those places where it just felt like the heart of Nubian Hueman, which is community,” Hobbs said in an interview with Live Anacostia. “We felt at home here.” Read full article here

Washingtonian Selects the Center as a Unique Co-working Spot in DC

A conglomerate of art exhibitions, boutiques, independently owned shops, a lounge area and a café, Anacostia Arts Center was created in 2013 to support the economic development of the neighborhood. But, over the past couple years, the lounge area—a space you pass through to get to the rest of the building—has morphed into a co-working spot.

The room has huge bay windows and skylights, and on the walls, artwork from rotating exhibits, making it an inspiring environment for getting work done. Read more here.

Metro Weekly Covers Doc About LGBT Entrepreneurs in Anacostia

When it was founded, a decade ago, the Check It was a support group for LGBTQ youths fed up with being bullied and mistreated. It quickly evolved into a gay street gang, whose members became notorious for viciously attacking their enemies. They became “the predators instead of the preyed-upon,” says gang counselor Ron “Mo” Moten.

Hoping to steer the kids clear of trouble, Moten introduced them to documentary filmmakers Dana Flor and Toby Oppenheimer (The Nine Lives of Marion Barry).

Read the full article here

The Washington Informer Highlights East of the River Artists

Between the two galleries housed in the Anacostia Arts Center and the Honfleur Gallery on Good Hope Road, there’s no shortage of art that conveys the level of talent that lies East of the River in Wards 7 and 8.

​The 11th annual East of the River Exhibition at the Honfleur Gallery features three female artists who have their own distinct styles and inspirations, but the pieces on view have a strong affinity between them and come from similar creative places. Each artist makes an individual statement about spirituality, identity and the repetition of forms and textures, but together they create a continuum. Read full article here